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10th year in a row CBA listed as an outstanding business school in the Princeton Review

10/25/2013

CBA FEATURED IN THE PRINCETON REVIEW'S

"BEST 295 BUSINESS SCHOOLS: 2014 EDITION"

The College of Business Administration (CBA) at The University of Akron is one of the nation's most outstanding business schools, according to the education services company, The Princeton Review. The Company features the school in the new 2014 edition of its book, “The Best 295 Business Schools” (Random House / Princeton Review, October 8, 2013, $22.99). This is the tenth consecutive year that Akron has been featured in the publication.

2012 Princeton Review According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publisher, “We recommend the College of Business Administration at The University of Akron as one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school degree. We chose the schools we profile in this book based on our high regard for their academic programs and our reviews of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also solicit and greatly respect the opinions of students attending these schools who rate and report on their experiences on our 80-question student survey for the book.”

The Princeton Review's survey asks business school students about their school's academics, student body and campus life as well as about themselves and their career plans. Conducted during the 2012-13, 2011-12, and 2010-11 academic years, the student surveys were completed online.

“We are delighted to be ranked in this prestigious list for a tenth straight year,” says Dr. Ravi Krovi, CBA dean and professor of management and information systems. “The Princeton Review accolade, in addition to the reaffirmation of our AACSB accreditation in January 2013, and the ranking of our undergraduate and part time MBA programs by Bloomberg Businessweek, validates our status as one of the premier business schools. It clearly reflects the sustained commitment of our faculty and staff toward student success. The CBA’s contemporary programs emphasize a variety of business functions along with a focus on leadership development, analytics and enterprise thinking. The college is also unique in its extensive collaboration with NE Ohio businesses through more than 240 corporate advisory board members. These ties to local businesses have added a real world dimension through guest lectures, curriculum reviews, professional development opportunities, real world projects and internships. Not surprisingly, the college’s placement rate is 87% making it one of the best value propositions to prospective students.”

“The Best 295 Business Schools: 2014 Edition” has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions. In the profile on Akron’s CBA, the Princeton Review editors note that students will find a program devoted to “preparing you for your future.” They highlight the college’s “strong network” noting that “companies in both public accounting and industry heavily recruit here” which makes it “very easy to land a job in whichever area you prefer.”

The profile includes quotes from CBA students who were surveyed by The Princeton Review for the book. Students commented on the “interactive environment” and diversity at Akron “that sparks interesting discussion both inside and outside of the classroom.” They noted that students will find that their classmates “are strong academically with important experience that contributes to classroom discussion.”

The school profiles in "The Best 295 Business Schools” have rating scores in five categories that The Princeton Review tallies based on institutional data it collected during the 2012-13 academic year and/or its student survey for the book. The ratings are scores on a scale of 60 to 99. Rating categories are: Academic Experience, Admissions Selectivity, Career, Professors Interesting, and Professors Accessible. Among the ratings in the CBA’s profile are scores of 85 for Academic Experience, 87 for Admissions Selectivity and 87 for Professors Interesting. The Princeton Review explains the basis for each rating score in the book and on its website.