Named scholarships

When it comes to earning a college degree, the greatest obstacle can be funding.

For this reason, The University of Akron is pleased for the opportunity each year to assist talented, deserving students achieve their dreams, thanks to more than 1,300 named scholarships established through the kindness and generosity of thousands of UA alumni and friends, corporations, and foundations.

Scholarships truly are the best way to ensure that today’s students persist to graduation. Scholarships allow students to enroll full time and remain focused on their studies; they also reduce drop-out rates, decrease the stress of student loans, and shorten the road to graduation.

The need for scholarships grows each year, however, as students continue to face an increased financial burden in pursuit of a college degree. In fact, 94 percent of today’s baccalaureate students borrow to pay for college – versus just 45 percent in 1993. Across the country, the average college-related debt for borrowers in the class of 2016 was $37,172; for Ohio students, that figure was $30,239.

If you are interested in making a significant contribution to student success, please consider a gift to the MAKING A DIFFERENCE AND MOVING FORWARD scholarship campaign, which is the University's most important initiative. You may also establish a named scholarship at The University of Akron, which can be created to honor a living person, in memory of a loved one, or to contribute to the growth of an area of study.

To learn more, please contact the Department of Development at 330-972-7238

How do I apply for a scholarship?

This is not the page to apply for scholarships.

Students who want to apply for scholarships should visit the scholarship page on the Financial Aid site.

The Department of Development does not accept applications for or distribute scholarships. Scholarships are distributed through the University’s Office of Student Financial Aid.

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Scholarship for First-Generation Engineering Students

Established in 2008 by Louis Laurich, The Scholarship for First-Generation Engineering Students is intended to assist students in The University of Akron’s College of Engineering who are the first in a family to attend college. As a first-generation student at The University of Akron, Mr. Laurich earned a B.S. in electrical engineering in 1971. During his time as a student, Mr. Laurich also was married and serving in the National Guard. He took advantage of student loans to put himself through college in five years. His academic experience at The University of Akron propelled him to a dynamic career with Firestone Tire and Rubber (later Bridgestone), J & J Computer Electronics, and ultimately the Akron Foundry/Electric Co., from which he retired. In retirement, Mr. Laurich remains active by teaching “ground school” to or mentoring aviation students at Medina Municipal Airport, where he is an advanced instrument instructor and an FAA safety team representative.

Establishing a scholarship to assist first-generation students in their academic pursuits in The University of Akron’s College of Engineering is Mr. Laurich’s generous way of giving back to his alma mater. In selecting recipients of the First-Generation scholarship, preference will be given to a junior or senior majoring in any academic program in the College of Engineering. Applicants must maintain a 2.3 GPA, confirm they are first in their family to attend a college or university, and express a sincere financial need. Students should apply in writing to the College of Engineering scholarship committee to express their interest in The Scholarship for First-Generation Engineering Students. Selection will be made by the dean of the College of Engineering with input from the department chairs and the student’s adviser in the College. Students having difficulty financially will be given priority to help their continuance.

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