Fall 2014 Seminar Series

Course 9841:601-001
Time: Fridays, 11:00 a.m.
Lectures are Free and Open to the Public

Click here to print the schedule

Date
Venue*
Guest Speaker and Abstract Title

Sept. 5

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Peter Green, Vincent T. and Gloria M. Gorguze Professor of Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Applied Physics, Director, Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan

"Morphological Design and Function of Thin Film Polymer Nanocomposites"

Sept. 19

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Luping Yu, Professor of Chemistry, The University of Chicago

"How to design low bandgap polymers for highly efficient OPV solar cells"

Sept. 26

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Jaime Grunlan, Associate Professor and Gulf Oil/Thomas A. Dietz Development Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University

"Multilayer Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films Capable of Separating Gases and Stopping Fire"

Oct. 3

GDYR
Alumni Day

Dr. Youngdon Kwon, Professor of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University of South Korea

"Computational Modeling of High De and Elastically Unstable Flow Phenomena"

Oct. 10

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Rodney Priestly, Assistant Professor and The Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University

"Engineering Structure and Properties in Polymer Thin Films and Nanoparticles"

Oct. 17

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Jeremiah Johnson, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Modular Polymer Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications"

Oct. 24

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Liming Dai, Kent Hale Smith Professor, Director, Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ

"Conjugated Macromolecules and Carbon Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage"

Oct. 31

GDYR
Eastman Lecture

Dr. Rajiv Kalia, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Physics, and Computer Science, University of Southern California

"TBA"

Nov. 7

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Brent Sumerlin, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Florida

"Reversible-covalent materials: Combining covalent integrity with adaptability"

Nov. 14

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Theresa Reineke, Lloyd H. Reyerson Professor, Nanoscience & Materials Chemistry; Chemical Biology; Polymer Chemistry, University of Minnesota

"Sugar-coated polymer synthesis: from sustainable materials to selective drug delivery"


*PEAC = Polymer Engineering Academic Center, Aggarwal Lecture Hall
*GDYR = Goodyear Polymer Center, Auditorium

ABSTRACTS

September 5, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Peter Green
Vincent T. and Gloria M. Gorguze Professor of Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Applied Physics, Director, Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan

"Morphological Design and Function of Thin Film Polymer Nanocomposites"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

September 19, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Luping Yu
Professor of Chemistry, The University of Chicago

"How to design low bandgap polymers for highly efficient OPV solar cells"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

September 26, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Jaime Grunlan
Associate Professor and Gulf Oil/Thomas A. Dietz Development Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University

"Multilayer Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films Capable of Separating Gases and Stopping Fire"

Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is wide-reaching conformal coating “platform” technology capable of imparting a multiplicity of functionalities on nearly any type of surface in a relatively environmentally friendly way. At its core, LbL is a solution deposition technique in which layers of cationic and anionic materials (e.g. colloidal or nano-particles, polymers and even biological molecules) are built up via electrostatic attractions in an alternating fashion, while controlling process variables such as pH, coating time, and concentration. Here we are producing nanocomposite multilayers having 10 – 96 wt% clay that are completely transparent and exhibit oxygen transmission rates below 0.005 cm3/m2•day (at a film thickness below 100 nm). These same ‘nanobrick wall’ assemblies are very conformal and able to impart flame resistance to highly flammable foam and fabric by uniformly coating the complex three-dimensional geometries. On foam, these coatings can simultaneously cut the heat release rate (HRR) in half, relative to uncoated foam, and eliminate melt dripping without adding halogenated flame retardants. We’ve also developed intumescent recipes that do not require clay, but rather rely on the foaming action of phosphorus and nitrogen-rich molecules. I’ll also describe how these films can separate H2 from N2, with selectivity greater than 2000, which exceeds other commonly used gas separation membranes (including zeolites). These films also have exceptional oxygen barrier that makes them interesting for food and flexible electronics packaging. These films can also be produced with graphene oxide to generate high barrier and low sheet resistance. All of the materials described are water-based and processing occurs under ambient conditions in most cases. Our work in these areas has been highlighted in C&EN, ScienceNews, Nature, Smithsonian Magazine, Chemistry World and various scientific news outlets worldwide. See our website for more information: http://nanocomposites.tamu.edu

Biography:
Dr. Jaime Grunlan joined Texas A&M University as a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in July of 2004, after spending three years at the Avery Research Center in Pasadena, CA as a Senior Research Engineer. He obtained a B.S. in Chemistry, with a Polymers & Coatings emphasis, from North Dakota State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Materials Science and Engineering. Prof. Grunlan was promoted to Associate Professor in September 2010 and Professor in September 2014. His research focuses on thermal and transport properties of nanocomposite materials, especially in the areas of thermoelectric energy generation, gas barrier and fire prevention. He won the NSF CAREER and 3M Untenured Faculty awards in 2007, the Dow 2009 Young Faculty Award, the 2010 Carl A. Dahlquist Award, the 2012 L.E. Scriven Young Investigator Award, sponsored by the ISCST, and the 2013 E. D. Brockett Professorship for his work in these areas. He has published over 90 journal papers and filed several patents. Dr. Grunlan also holds joint appointments in Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering.

Back

October 3, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
Alumni Day

Dr. Youngdon Kwon
Professor of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University of South Korea

"Computational Modeling of High De and Elastically Unstable Flow Phenomena"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

October 10, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Rodney Priestly
Assistant Professor and The Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University

"Engineering Structure and Properties in Polymer Thin Films and Nanoparticles"

Polymer thin films and nanoparticles will enable emerging nanoscale technologies, including nanoimprint lithography for microelectronics, membranes for efficient separations and batteries, polymer solar cells for energy, coatings for barrier protection, nano-vehicles for controlled drug delivery, and components for fluorescent imaging and photonic structures. These commercial demands have dramatically escalated the need for new routes to process polymer thin films and nanoparticles with greater control over structure and properties. In this talk, we discuss Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) and Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP) as unique approaches for the processing of polymer thin films and nanoparticles, respectively, with greater control over structure and properties, as compared to conventional processing methods.

Biography:
Rodney D. Priestley is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Princeton University. He obtained his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University in 2008. He completed a NSF/Chateaubriand postdoctoral fellowship at Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris. His research interests include polymer glasses, nanoconfined polymer dynamics, polymer thin film and nanoparticle formation, MAPLE and responsive polymers. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Quadrant Award, ACS New Investigator Grant, 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Grant, NSF CAREER Award, AFOSR YIP, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientist and Engineers, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award.

Back

October 17, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Jeremiah Johnson
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Modular Polymer Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

October 24, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Liming Dai
Kent Hale Smith Professor, Director, Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ

"Conjugated Macromolecules and Carbon Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

October 31, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
Eastman Lecture

Dr. Rajiv Kalia
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Physics, and Computer Science, University of Southern California

"TBD"

Abstract coming soon.

Back

November 7, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Brent Sumerlin
Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Florida

"Reversible-covalent materials: Combining covalent integrity with adaptability"

We are interested in exploiting the readily controlled reversibility of many covalent bonds to access robust materials with dynamic behavior. These dynamic-covalent materials combine the properties of structural integrity with responsiveness and adaptability. We have prepared a variety of polymers that contain readily reversible covalent bonds, including dynamic-covalent branched macromolecules, stars, networks, and other reorganizable polymers. A diverse set of reversible covalent bonds has been considered, and while each of these bonds is sufficiently stabile to be used for constructing or functionalizing polymers, they can also be readily cleaved by heating, adding water (i.e., hydrolysis), or adding a catalyst or reducing agent that shifts the equilibrium from products to reactants. This presentation will focus on our work in the area of dynamic-covalent materials, with particular attention being paid to those composed of boronic or boronate esters. The reversible nature of the boron-containing crosslinks within these systems allow these materials to reversibly reconfigure their topology via competitive exchange reactions or by manipulation of the dynamic-covalent equilibrium. In addition to dynamic nanoparticles, network polymers in the solid or gel state have been prepared. By tuning the properties of the polymer matrix and the reversible bonds contained therein, it was possible to prepare materials that demonstrated intrinsic self-healing behavior.

Biography:
Brent Sumerlin graduated with a B.S. from North Carolina State University in 1998 and received his Ph.D. in Polymer Science & Engineering in 2003 at the University of Southern Mississippi under the direction of Dr. Charles McCormick. He continued his work as a Visiting Assistant Professor/Postdoctoral Research Associate in the group of Krzysztof Matyjaszewski at Carnegie Mellon University from 2003–2005. In 2005 he joined the Department of Chemistry at Southern Methodist University as an Assistant Professor. In 2009 he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure. In the fall of 2012, Prof. Sumerlin joined the George & Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory and the Center for Macromolecular Science & Engineering within the Department of Chemistry at the University of Florida as an Associate Professor. His work has been well recognized in the scientific community. In 2011 he was named a Kavli Fellow (Frontiers of Science, National Academies of Sciences). In 2010 he was named an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and a Gerald J. Ford Research Fellow. He has received an NSF CAREER Award, ACS Leadership Development Award, the Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award, and was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. He serves on the editorial boards for 13 journals and is Associate Editor of the RSC journal Polymer Chemistry.

Back

November 14, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Theresa Reineke
Lloyd H. Reyerson Professor, Nanoscience & Materials Chemistry; Chemical Biology; Polymer Chemistry, University of Minnesota

"Sugar-coated polymer synthesis: from sustainable materials to selective drug delivery"

Abstract coming soon.

Back



The University of Akron

Akron, OH 44325
Phone: 330-972-7111
Contact us
Send mail & deliveries to UA
Text-Only