Spring 2015 Seminar Series | Bayer Lectureship | SABIC Lectureship | Special Seminars

Spring 2015 Seminar Series

Course 9841:601-001
Time: Fridays, 11:00 a.m.
Lectures are Free and Open to the Public

Click here to print the schedule

Date
Venue*
Guest Speaker and Abstract Title

Jan. 30

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Tara Meyer, Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, PA

"Sequence Control in Copolymers: Synthesis and Consequences"

Feb. 6

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Ryan Hayward, Associate Professor, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering of University of Massachusetts Amherst

"Folding gels and shells: Designing reconfigurable 3D shapes and ‘mechanical meta-materials"

Feb. 13

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Brian Grady, Director of the School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering in the College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma

"Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Effect of Nanotubes on Polymer Physics"

Feb. 19
Thursday

GDYR

Dr. Brad Olsen, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Self-Assembly of Globular Proteins Using Bioconjugate and Fusion Block Copolymers"

Feb. 27

GDYR

Dr. Neil Ayres, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, The University of Cincinnati, OH

"Synthesis and Evaluation of Polyurea-based Heparin Mimics"

Apr. 3

GDYR
EASTMAN LECTURE

Dr. Paula Hammond, David H. Koch Professor and Executive Officer, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"TBA"

Apr. 10

GDYR

Dr. Joe Schlenoff, Mandelkern Professor of Polymer Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL

"Saloplastics: Processing Polymers Using Salt"

Apr. 16-17
Thursday & Friday

GDYR
BAYER LECTURE

Dr. Michael Rubner, TDK Professor of Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"1) Hydrogen-Bonded Multilayers: from Zwitter-Wettable Surfaces to pH-Controlled Multi-Stage Dissolution
2) Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Assemblies for Biomedical Applications
"

Apr. 24

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Vladimir Tsukruk, Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, W Georgia Tech

"Engineered Bionanocomposites"

CANCELLED
May 1

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Jennifer Lewis, Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

"TBA"


*PEAC = Polymer Engineering Academic Center, Aggarwal Lecture Hall
*GDYR = Goodyear Polymer Center, Auditorium

ABSTRACTS

January 30, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Tara Meyer
Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, PA

"Sequence Control in Copolymers: Synthesis and Consequences"

If sequence could be fully exploited as a tool in the design of synthetic copolymers, the library of polymeric materials that could be used to address needs in fields like energy, medicine, environmental science and nanotechnology would expand to a degree that nearly defies calculation. Sequence remains, however, one of the least explored frontiers in polymer chemistry despite the abundant evidence of the potential utility for encoding information and controlling properties that comes to us from the natural world. The Meyer group is interested in exploring both the development of new synthetic approaches to repeating sequence copolymers and in characterizing structure/function relationships for these materials. We have focused significant attention on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)s (PLGAs) because of their importance in bioengineering applications such as drug delivery and biodegradable scaffolding. Using a “Segmer Assembly Polymerization” (SAP) approach we have prepared a library of over 30 repeating sequence PLGAs and determined that the solution phase conformations, thermal behavior, and hydrolysis profiles depend on sequence. We have also examined the influence of sequence in conjugated systems and have probed, in particular, the effect of sequence on photophysical properties relevant to photovoltaic applications.

Biography:
Tara Y. Meyer received her B.A. from Grinnell College in 1986 and her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1991. Her doctoral thesis, under the supervision of Prof. Louis Messerle, focused on the reactivity of early transition metal acyl complexes. She carried out postdoctoral work at both the University of Iowa (1991-2) under the supervision of Prof. Richard F. Jordan and at the University of California, Berkeley (1992-4) under the joint supervision of Prof. Robert G. Bergman and Bruce M. Novak. Dr. Meyer joined the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemistry in 1994 and is a member of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Her work has been recognized by both CAREER and Sloan Foundation Awards and a sabbatical stay at MIT (2003) was supported by an NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award. Dr. Meyer’s research focuses on synthesis and structure/function studies on repeating sequence copolymers and on the design of stimuli responsive materials.

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February 6, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Ryan Hayward
Associate Professor, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering of University of Massachusetts Amherst

"Folding gels and shells: Designing reconfigurable 3D shapes and ‘mechanical meta-materials"

Thin elastic plates and shells subjected to compressive stress can undergo a wide variety of geometry-dependent mechanical shape instabilities. Our group seeks to take advantage of these phenomena, in combination with new approaches in materials chemistry to develop systems with tailored and reconfigurable 3D shapes and properties. In particular, we have studied the use of photo-crosslinkable polymer films to prepare polymer sheets and multilayers containing stimuli-responsive hydrogel elements. This approach provides access to both smoothly curved plates with programmed Gaussian curvature, and sharply folded films suitable for reversibly self-folding micro-scale origami. The folding of curved surfaces is largely unexplored, but our initial investigations have revealed simple geometric principles for designing bistable structures connected by rapid snap-buckling transitions.

Biography:
Dr. Ryan Hayward is an Associate Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He received degrees in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University (B.S.E, 1999) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (Ph.D., 2004), and was a post-doctoral fellow in Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University from 2004-2005. His group’s research covers a variety of topics in polymers and soft materials, with a focus on thin films and interfaces. Recent areas of interest include swelling-induced deformation of constrained and micro-patterned stimuli-responsive gels, and solution state self-assembly of polymer and particle-based nanostructures. Ryan has received several awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the 2013 Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award, and the 2014 John H. Dillon Medal of the American Physical Society. He is an Associate Editor for the journal ACS Macro Letters.

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February 13, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Brian Grady
Director of the School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering in the College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma

"Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Effect of Nanotubes on Polymer Physics"

Carbon nanotubes are in many ways similar to polymers. Both molecules have contour lengths typically on the order of 1 micron, and, for single-walled tubes, diameters between 0.5 and 1 nm. In terms of physics, the significant difference between the two is the significantly larger inflexibility of a nanotube, which is quantified by an orders-of-magnitude larger persistence length. This talk will describe how nanotube and polymer physics interact with one another in composites of the two materials. While the talk will focus on work done in the author’s lab, important studies done by others will also be discussed. The author will also briefly discuss how these physics affect commercial products that contain nanotubes and finally discuss the challenges that still remain in this area.

Biography:
Brian P. Grady received a B.S. from the University of Illinois in 1987, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1994, both in Chemical Engineering. Since 1994, he has been employed by the University of Oklahoma as a faculty member in the School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering and currently is the Conoco-DuPont Professor of Chemical Engineering as well as Director of the School. He has authored over 120 refereed publications and book chapters and is also the author of a book entitled “Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites Manufacture, Properties and Applications”. He has served in leadership positions in the Society of Plastics Engineers, the American Oil Chemist Society and the North American Thermal Analysis Society. He is also a fellow of the Society of Plastics Engineers.

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February 19, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center

Dr. Brad Olsen
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Self-Assembly of Globular Proteins Using Bioconjugate and Fusion Block Copolymers"

Protein-based materials show a great deal of potential as catalysts, sensors, and optoelectronics, where the unique efficiency, selectivity, or activity of enzymes can be captured to improve the performance of these devices. Control over the structure and orientation of the protein in three dimensions is required to improve transport through the devices, increase the density of active sites, and optimize the stability of the protein. We demonstrate self-assembly of globular protein-polymer conjugates and fusion proteins into nanostructured phases as an elegant and simple method for structural control in biomaterials. These conjugates or fusions may be conceptualized as diblock copolymers, where the first block is the globular protein and the second block is the synthetic polymer or coil-like protein sequence. Phase diagrams for these materials have been prepared as a function of coil fraction and water content in the materials, providing insight into the type of self-assembled nanostructures that may be formed. The phase diagram differs significantly from that of traditional block copolymers; the globular protein-polymer conjugates show predominantly hexagonal phases at a coil volume fraction less than 0.5 with lamellar phases above 0.5. Comparison of copolymers with different polymer blocks shows that new phases are observed when changing polymer chemistry and that the polymer-protein interaction has a strong impact on the order-disorder transition concentration in solution. Comparisons of structurally similar but chemically different proteins enable the effects of protein shape and protein surface chemistry to be isolated and suggest that monomer-level details of the protein have little impact on self-assembly. Together, these results begin to lay a foundation for understanding the general principles of self-assembly in block copolymers containing globular proteins. Self-assembly of the materials in thin films can produce highly functional biocatalysts. Using a low shear flow-coating process, protein-polymer conjugates may be self-assembled into uniform thin films with thicknesses of 10’s to 100’s of nm. The type of nanostructure formed and orientation of nanostructures is shown to depend upon the coating condition. When coatings are prepared from the peroxidase myoglobin, they show a high activity per area, consistent with rapid transport into the films and a high density of active enzyme. Compared to competing methods for enzyme immobilization or encapsulation in polymer films, block copolymer self-assembly provides a five to ten-fold enhanced activity.

Biography:
Bradley Olsen is the Paul M. Cook Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at MIT. He earned his S.B. in Chemical Engineering at MIT, his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of California – Berkeley, and was a postdoctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology. He started as an assistant professor at MIT in December 2009. Olsen’s research expertise is in materials chemistry and polymer physics, with a particular emphasis on molecular self-assembly, block copolymers, polymer networks and gels, and protein biomaterials. He has been recognized with a the American Physical Society Division of Polymer Physics/UK Polymer Physics Group Exchange Lectureship for Young Investigators, an NSF CAREER award, the Air Force Young Investigator Award, and a Sloan Fellowship. Recently, he was also awarded the Chemical Engineering Graduate Teaching Award at MIT for his course on statistical mechanics.

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February 27, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center

Dr. Neil Ayres
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, The University of Cincinnati, OH

"Synthesis and Evaluation of Polyurea-based Heparin Mimics"

Biomaterials interface with biological systems to improve or treat these systems. Depending on the application different biomaterials require different mechanical, physical, or electrical properties. Therefore, the biocompatibility and performance of a biomaterial is dependent on the chemistry of the material. In our work we have focused on polymer blood-compatibility. Our primary goal has been to prepare synthetic polyureas that can mimic the function of heparin, a naturally occurring anticoagulant polysaccharide. This presentation will detail our progress in this area including the synthesis methodology we have developed, and our investigations into various structure property relationships. These relationships include the identity of pendant sugars on the polyurea and the isocyanates used to make the polyurea. Recent work looking at shape memory properties will also be included.

Biography:
Neil Ayres received his Ph. D. in chemistry from the University of Warwick in 2003 where he worked for Prof. David Haddleton investigating surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). After working as a post doc at the University of Southern Mississippi, the University of Akron, and the University of Utah, he became a professor in the department of chemistry at the University of Cincinnati in 2008. He received tenure and promotion to Associate Professor in 2014 and currently has research interests in synthetic chemistry of biomaterials and controlled polymerizations.

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April 3, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
EASTMAN LECTURE

Dr. Paula Hammond
David H. Koch Professor and Executive Officer, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"TBA"

Abstract coming soon.

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April 10, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center

Dr. Joe Schlenoff
Mandelkern Professor of Polymer Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL

"Saloplastics: Processing Polymers Using Salt"

Engineers are accustomed to heating polymers, "thermoplastics," past transition temperatures to soften, then extrude or mold them. We have discovered that blends of polyelectrolytes, or charged polymers, can be softened by adding salt solution, which breaks interactions between polymer molecules. I will talk about the new concept of time/temperature/salt superposition and how it can be used to explain the properties of these "saloplastics." I will also present examples of the biocompatibility of these complexes and their behavior at the biological interface.

Biography:
Professor Joseph B. Schlenoff is the Distinguished Research Professor Leo Mandelkern Professor of Polymer Science at Florida State University’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His earned PhD from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1987 and joined the faculty at FSU in 1988. Dr. Schlenoff holds as many as 30 issued patents and is the founder of the start-up nanoStrata. Dr. Schlenoff was one of three researchers worldwide to be awarded a Gutenberg Chair for 2011 at the Université de Strasbourg in France. In 2013, Dr. Schlenoff received the Florida Award from ACS.

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April 16-17, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
BAYER LECTURE

Dr. Michael Rubner
TDK Professor of Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1) "Hydrogen-Bonded Multilayers: from Zwitter-Wettable Surfaces to pH-Controlled Multi-Stage Dissolution"
2) "Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Assemblies for Biomedical Applications"

Click here to read the abstracts.

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April 24, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Vladimir Tsukruk
Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, W Georgia Tech

"Engineered Bionanocomposites"

I discuss recent results from our research group on designing responsive silk-based LbL nanomaterials for tunable microcapsules, conformal cell protection, and ultra-strong and conductive bionanocomposites. Ultrathin silk fibroin shells are assembled in order to conduct surface modification and protection of microparticles, cells and cell assemblies and form permeable microcapsules. Biocompatible, compliant and permeable LbL shells in our study are formed from various silk fibroins, their ionomers, and pegylated derivatives and transferred to various yeast and bacterial cells. Organized multiplexed arrays of ink-jet printed silk templates have been utilized for cell encapsulation with high viability and their long-term storage for biosensing arrays. On the other hand, ultra strong laminated bionanocomposites from silk and graphene oxide components with unique interphase morphology were found to possess extremely high elastic modulus and toughness as well conductive patterning with localized electrochemical reduction.

Biography:
Vladimir V. Tsukruk received his MS degree in physics from the National University of Ukraine, PhD in polymers and DSc in chemistry and polymer science from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He carried out his post-doc research at the U. Marburg, Darmstadt TU, and U. Akron. He is currently a Professor at the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and a Director of Microanalysis Center. He serves on the editorial advisory boards of seven professional journals, has co-authored around 390 refereed articles in archival journals, as well as five books, has organized ten professional symposia, and trained about 60 students and post-docs. His research in the field of surfaces, interfaces, and molecular assembly of synthetic and natural polymers, nano- and bioinspired nanomaterials has been recognized by the Humboldt Research Award (2009) and the NSF Special Creativity Award (2006), among others. He was elected as an APS Fellow in 2010, a MRS Fellow in 2011, and an ACS Fellow in 2014. His recent book (V. V. Tsukruk, S. Singamaneni: Scanning Probe Microscopy of Soft Matter: Fundamentals and Practices, Wiley, 2012) is a popular comprehensive textbook on SPM applications of synthetic and biological materials.

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CANCELLED May 1, 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Jennifer Lewis
Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

"TBA"

Abstract coming soon.

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