Spring 2014 Seminar Series

Spring 2014 Seminar Series

Course 9841:601-001
Time: Fridays, 11:00 a.m.
Lectures are Free and Open to the Public

Click here to print the schedule

Date
Venue*
Guest Speaker and Abstract Title

Jan. 17

PEAC
PAM

Dr. Nicholas Kotov, Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

"Layered Biomimetic Nanocomposites: From Materials Design to Scalable Nanotechnology"

Jan. 31

PEAC
PAM

Dr. David Martin, Karl and Renate Böer Professor and Chair, Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware

"Functionalized and Branched Conjugated Polythiophenes for Biomedical Device Interfaces"

Feb. 7

PEAC
PAM

Dr. Richard Superfine, Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

"The River Within: How the Lung Stays Clean"

Feb. 21

GDYR
Milkovich

Dr. Ken Wagener, George B. Butler Professor of Polymer Chemistry and Director, Center for Macromolecular Science and Engineering - Department of Chemistry
George & Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory - University of Florida

"TBA"

Mar. 14

PEAC
Aldrich Lecture

Dr. Matthew Tirrell, Pritzker Director and Professor Institute for Molecular Engineering University of Chicago

"Polyelectrolytes in multivalent ionic media: New physics and new materials"

Apr. 4

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Jeremiah Johnson, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"New Strategies for the Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Networks and Nanoparticles"

Apr. 11

PEAC
PAM

Dr. Robert Prud’homme, Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Director, Program in Engineering Biology, Princeton

"Facile Production of Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Hydrophobic Therapeutics by Block-Copolymer-Directed Rapid Precipitation"

Apr. 18

GDYR
PAM

Dr. Christopher Biewlawski, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas

"Externally Controlled Chemistry: New Methods for Manipulating Polymerization and Other Reactions"

May 2

PEAC
PAM

Dr. Curtis Frank, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Professor of Chemical Engineering, W.M. Keck Senior Professor in Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University

"TBA"


*PEAC = Polymer Engineering Academic Center, Aggarwal Lecture Hall
*GDYR = Goodyear Polymer Center, Auditorium

ABSTRACTS

January 17, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
PAM

Dr. Nicholas Kotov
Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

"Layered Biomimetic Nanocomposites: From Materials Design to Scalable Nanotechnology"

Finding materials with combinations of several extreme properties is one of the key requirements for the successful engineering of adaptive systems. Many of such challenges are represented by the blank areas of Ashby plots, but others are less known. Successful realization of such materials requires new choices for materials components and new approaches for materials "assembly". Layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) is materials manufacturing technique from nanomaterials that affords engineering of nanocomposite materials based on sequential adsorption of nanometer scale layers of polymers and inorganic particle, nanowires, nanotubes, sheets, etc. In this presentation we demonstrate that LBL and related techniques can lead to the materials with seemingly "impossible" combinations of physical properties encompassing mechanical, electrical, optical, and biological properties. We will make particular emphasis in this presentation on nanoparticles composites which consistently demonstrate exceptional performance and display the potential for scalability. Hard-to-reach combinations of electrical and mechanical properties necessary for a number of technologies will be discussed. Finding composites with high stiffness properties + high damping and as well as high stiffness + transparency will be demonstrated. The pathway toward successful realization of two, three, and four different properties based on the structural designs and computer simulations is possible and will be exemplified using nanocomposites used for biomedical applications, such as brain implants. A new type of nanoscale "building blocks’ such as aramid nanofibers (ANFs) can also be incorporated in such composites combining several hard-to-reach properties with potential applications as ion conductors for lithium ion batteries will be described. The last part of the talk will describe our latest exploits in the area of composites from plasmonic nanoparticles and materials designs to achieve the combination of high conductivity and high stretchability.

Biography:
Nicholas A. Kotov is Joseph and Florence Cejka Professor of Engineering at University of Michigan. He graduated from Moscow State University where he was working on working on biomimetic interfaces for solar energy conversion. The focus of his current research projects is self-organization of nanoparticles into complex biomimetic systems – chains, sheets, helices and others. Such assemblies enable integration with microscale technologies and energy-conservative production of biosensing, energy conversion, electronic devices, catalysts, and protective coatings. His ongoing reseach projects also include advanced composites made by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly that represent another example of biomimetic nanoscale materials. Mechanical properties of LBL multilayers from nanoparticle of clay and other materials replicating those of nacre as the unique natural composite material were at the onset of his studies in this area. Prof. Kotov receives multiple university, national, and international awards. He was elected as Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry in 2012. He serves as an Associate Editor for ACS Nano and as a member of Advisory Boards of several nanotechnology and materials journals.

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January 31, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
PAM

Dr. David Martin
Karl and Renate Böer Professor and Chair, Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware

"Functionalized and Branched Conjugated Polythiophenes for Biomedical Device Interfaces"

We are investigating the design, synthesis, and characterization of conjugated polythiophenes for interfacing a variety of electronic biomedical devices with living tissue. Examples of these devices include microfabricated neural electrodes for direct brain-machine interfaces, cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants, and next-generation bionic limbs. Conjugated polymers significantly lower the barriers to charge transport between the hard, electronically conductive implant and the soft, ionically conductive tissue. Our current focus are variants of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT). We typically deposit these materials using oxidative electrochemical deposition. The morphology of the deposited films can be readily controlled, and has been characterized using optical, scanned probe, and electron microscopy.

Biography:
David C. Martin is currently the Karl W. and Renate Böer Professor and Chair of Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Delaware. His research interests include the development of conducting polymer coatings for integrating biomedical devices in living tissue, high-resolution microscopy and impedance spectroscopy studies of defects in ordered polymers and organic semiconductors, and the deformation behavior of crystalline polymer and organic molecular materials near surfaces. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Army Research Office, and the National Institutes of Health. Before 2009 Prof. Martin was Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI, and is Founder and Chief Scientific Officer for Biotectix LLC, of Quincy, MA. He is currently Chair of the Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (PMSE) Division of the American Chemical Society. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the American Physical Society, and was an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany from 1997-1998. Before arriving at Michigan Prof. Martin worked on polyimide morphology with Kenn Gardner and Larry Berger at DuPont Central Research & Development in Wilmington, DE. Prof. Martin received his Ph.D. in 1990 in Polymer Science and Engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, under the direction of Prof. Edwin L. Thomas, now the Dean of Engineering at Rice. He has held previous positions at the General Motors Research Center in Warren, MI; at IBM Technology Division in Burlington, VT; and at GE Carboloy Systems Division in Detroit, MI.

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February 7, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
PAM

Dr. Richard Superfine
Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

"The River Within: How the Lung Stays Clean"

Abstract coming soon.

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February 21, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
Milkovich Lecture

Dr. Ken Wagener
George B. Butler Professor of Polymer Chemistry and Director, Center for Macromolecular Science and Engineering - Department of Chemistry
George & Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory - University of Florida

"TBA"

Abstract coming soon.

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March 14, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
Aldrich Lecture

Dr. Matthew Tirrell
Pritzker Director and Professor Institute for Molecular Engineering University of Chicago

"Polyelectrolytes in multivalent ionic media: New physics and new materials"

Multi-valent interactions in systems of polyelectrolytes can exhibit dramatic, non-monotonic effects, for example, switching forces from repulsive to attractive, and back to repulsive again, in some cases. We have been studying these patterns of behavior with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) and with electrochemical methods, such as cyclic voltametry, which enables the quantitative determination of the number of multi-valent ions residing in thin layers of charged polymers. We have looked at di-valent ions such as Ca2+, tri-valent metal ions such as Al3+ and La3+, surfactants such as CTAB, as well as the complex ions useful for electrochemistry. At fixed ionic strength, all cause strong shrinkage and condensation of poly(styrene sulfonate) brushes over a narrow range of ratio multi-valent to mono-valent ions. Effects of these multi-valent interactions on supermolecular and biomolecular assembly will be considered. There are many possibilities for the creation of new materials based on electrostatic assembly involving mutli-valent interactions.

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April 4, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Jeremiah Johnson
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"New Strategies for the Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Networks and Nanoparticles"

Abstract coming soon.

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April 11, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
PAM

Dr. Robert Prud’homme
Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Director, Program in Engineering Biology, Princeton

"Facile Production of Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Hydrophobic Therapeutics by Block-Copolymer-Directed Rapid Precipitation"

Hydrophobic drugs present unique opportunities for treatment of solid tumor cancers and for providing sustained release and targeting. A challenge in the field has been to create robust and reproducible processes to assemble these nanoparticles in a way that can scale from milligram quantitities in research to kilogram quantities in production. Our process - Flash NanoPrecipitation – a controlled precipitation process produces stable nanoparticles at high concentrations using amphiphilic diblock copolymers to direct self-assembly. The key to the process is the control of time scales for micromixing, polymer self-assembly, and particle nucleation and growth. While milling can produce small particles, the unique feature of our process is the ability to produce multifunctional nanoparticles from hydrophobic actives, imaging agents, and targeting ligands in a single step. The PEG protective layer creates long-circulating particles and the inclusion of PEG chains with terminal ligands enables drug targeting. The incorporation of gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, or fluorophores into the composite particle enables imaging by x-ray, MRI, or confocal microscopy, respectively. The use of hydrolytically unstable linkers enables the controlled release of single and multiple drugs from nanoparticles to create "drug cocktails" in a way that has not been possible previously.

Biography:
Robert K. Prud'homme is a professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Princeton University and Director of the Engineering Biology Program at Princeton. He received his BS at Stanford University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison under Professor Bob Bird. He has served on the executive committees of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Materials Science Division and the U.S. Society of Rheology and was the President of the U.S. Society of Rheology. He served as the chair of the Technical Advisory Board for Material Science Research for Dow Chemical Company, which directs Dow’s materials research programs, and he was on the Board of Directors of Rheometric Scientific Inc., the leading manufacturer of rheological instrumentation. He also served on the Nanotechnology Scientific Advisory Committee for BASF, which provided guidance for future trends in nanotechnology for the company. His awards include the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science Outstanding Teaching Award, the Sydney Ross Lectureship at RPI, the Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot Lecturer at the University of Wisconsin, the Dinesh Shah lectureship at the University of Florida, and the Midland Macromolecular Institute Visiting Professor in Midland Michigan. He has been the organizer and Chair of the Gordon Conference on Ion Containing Polymers, and the Society of Petroleum Engineers Forum on Stimulation Fluid Rheology, in addition to organizing numerous sessions at AIChE, ACS, and SOR meetings. He directed the Princeton-University of Minnesota-Iowa State NSF NIRT Center on nanoparticle formation. His research interests include rheology and self-assembly of complex fluids. Systems of interest are biopolymer solutions and gels, surfactant mesophases, and polymer/surfactant mixtures. The goals of the studies are to understand how weak molecular-level interactions can be used to tune macroscopic bulk properties and phase behavior. Application of the work is directed at nanoparticle formation for the drug delivery, controlled release, targeting, and imaging.

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April 18, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Goodyear Auditorium, Room 229
Located in the Goodyear Polymer Center
PAM

Dr. Christopher Biewlawski
Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas

"Externally Controlled Chemistry: New Methods for Manipulating Polymerization and Other Reactions"

Abstract coming soon.

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May 2, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

Aggarwal Lecture Hall, Room 130
Located in the Polymer Engineering Academic Center
PAM

Dr. Curtis Frank
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Professor of Chemical Engineering, W.M. Keck Senior Professor in Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University

"TBA"

Abstract coming soon.

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