Profile

Dr. Tom T. Hartley

Dr. Tom T. Hartley

Title: Professor
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Office: ASEC 454B
Phone: 330-972-5991
Fax: 330-972-6487
Email: thartley@uakron.edu
Website: http://coel.ecgf.uakron.edu/hartley/index.html


Biography

Tom T. Hartley                 Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
                                                The University of Akron
                                                Akron, OH  44325-3904, thartley@uakron.edu, 330-802-5571
 
Education:          

Vanderbilt University                         Ph.D. Electrical Engineering                 1984
Vanderbilt University                         M.S. Physics                                       1982
Ohio Northern University                   B.S. Electrical Engineering                   1980
Ohio Northern University                   B.S. Physics                                       1980
                     
Appointments:
        The University of Akron, The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
                                1994-Present, Professor
                                1988-1994, Associate Professor
                                1984-1988, Assistant Professor
 
        NASA Glenn Research Center, The Electrochemistry Branch and The Inst. and Controls Div.
                                January 2001 – June 2001, Faculty Improvement Leave
                                                                                               
        NASA Lewis (Glenn) Research Center, The System Dynamics Branch and The Ohio Aerospace Inst.
                                June 1992 - June 1993, Faculty Improvement Leave
                                               
        NASA Lewis (Glenn) Research Center, The Advanced Control Technology Branch
                                June 1987 - Dec. 1987, Aerospace Technologist (during 90% leave from U. of A.)
 
        NASA Lewis Research Center, The Advanced Control Technology Branch
                               Summer 1986, NASA Summer Faculty Fellow
                                                                               
Some Selected Publications:
 
1. “Identification of Complex Order-Distributions,” Jay L. Adams, Tom T. Hartley, Carl F. Lorenzo,
     Journal of Vibration and Control, 2008.
 
 2.“Finite-time Controllability of Fractional-order Systems,” Jay L. Adams, Tom T. Hartley, ASME Journal of Computational and  Nonlinear Dynamics, vol 3, no 2, pp 021402-1 to 021402-5, April 2008.
 
3. “Application of the Incomplete Gamma Functions to the Initialization of Fractional-order Systems,” Tom T. Hartley and Carl F. Lorenzo, ASME Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, vol 3, no 2, pp 021101-1 to 021101-9, April 2008.
 
4. “Initialization of Fractional Differential Equations,” Carl. F. Lorenzo and Tom T. Hartley, ASME Journal of Computational and  Nonlinear Dynamics, vol 3, no 2, pp 021103-1 to 021103-6, April 2008.
 
5. “The Fracstrum: A Fractional Generalization of the Spectrum,” Carl F. Lorenzo and Tom T. Hartley, JESA, January 30, 2008.
 
6. “Hankel Operators for Fractional-order Systems,” Jay L. Adams and Tom T. Hartley, JESA, January 30, 2008.
 
7. “Ultracapacitor Energy Management and Controller Development for a Series-Parallel 2x2 Hybrid Electric Vehicle,” Jared Hicks, Robert Gruich, Alex Oldja, Dustin Myers, Tom T. Hartley, Robert Veillette, Iqbal Husain, IEEE Vehicular Propulsion and Power Conference, Arlington, TX, Sept. 2007.
 
8. “Coordinated Discharge of a Collection of Batteries,” Omer Gundungus, Shiva Sastry, Robert J. Veillette, Tom T. Hartley,  Journal of Power Sources, Feb. 2007.
 
9. “Battery Modeling for the International Space Station,” Tom T. Hartley and Anthony Jannette, NASA Battery Workshop, Huntsville, AL, November, 2005.
 
10.“A First-Principles Battery Model for the International Space Station,” Tom T. Hartley and Anthony Jannette, IECEC 2005, San Francisco, CA, August 2005.
 
11.“Optimal Battery Charging for Damage Mitigation,” Tom T. Hartley and Carl F. Lorenzo, presented at the NASA Battery Workshop, Huntsville, AL, November 2002.
 
12. “A Frequency-Domain Approach to Optimal Fractional-Order Damping,” Tom T. Hartley and Carl F. Lorenzo, Journal of Nonlinear Dynamics, vol 38, nos 1-4, pp 69-84, December 2004.
 
13.“Fractional System Identification Based on Continuous Order-Distributions,” Tom T. Hartley and Carl F. Lorenzo, Signal Processing, vol  83, pages 2287-2300, 2003.
 
14.“Chaos in a Fractional Chua Order System," T.T. Hartley, C.F. Lorenzo & H.K. Qammar, IEEE Trans. Circuits & Systems I, vol 42, no 8, pp 485-490, August, 1995.
 
15.Digital Simulation: A Control Systems Approach, Tom T. Hartley,  G.O. Beale, & S.P. Chicatelli, Textbook published by Prentice-Hall, March 1994.
 
Synergistic Activities:
 

Dr. Hartley is an internationally recognized expert in fractional-order systems.  With Carl Lorenzo at NASA Glenn Research Center, he has solved fundamental problems in the area, including Riemann’s complementary-function initialization problem.  They have presented novel concepts in fractional-order system theory including distributed-order systems, variable-order systems, conjugated-order systems, introduced the generalized exponential functions, the F- and R-functions, developed the generalized fractional-trigonometry, determined the optimal fractional-order damper, and were the first to demonstrate chaos in systems of order less than three.  We have numerous publications in the area, and ongoing research.
 

Dr. Hartley works on battery dynamics, modeling, and management.  His energy-related work with NASA Glenn Research Center includes specific applications to batteries and energy storage.  The battery research deals with minimum-damage charging techniques to extend battery life.  This has required the development of a generally useful battery modeling method based on first principles.  This model has been implemented numerous times for both NiH2 batteries and LiCoO2 batteries using microcontrollers to determine the state-of-charge of individual battery cells, and provide life-extending control for the particular cell.  The team has received a patent for this life-extending battery management technology.  During this time, Dr. Hartley has been involved in International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope, and Constellation battery research.  He also served on a NASA Tiger Team studying the International Space Station batteries after the loss of Columbia.
 

Dr. Hartley has also worked with several local companies on battery management.  He managed a team of students working with Myers Motors on the Progressive Automotive X-Prize.  The team developed a microcontroller-based wireless battery management system for LiFePO4 batteries for which they have a patent disclosure.  The team also developed a management system for NASA’s new lunar rover which was selected as Second Place in the NASA Moon Work Competition in 2009.  Dr. Hartley has been working with battery companies eVionyx, ZnErgy, and the University of Akron Research Foundation doing fundamental research on the behavior of NiZn batteries.  This team has developed a battery management system for the NiZn batteries and has the only patent disclosure for that.  This battery system has been implemented in both an electric car and an electric truck, as well as two electric bicycles.  Two electric tricycles are in development.
 

Dr. Hartley has reorganized the freshman Electrical and Computer Engineering Tools class in the last few years, and incorporated over 20 hands-on lab sessions.  He has also been advising several undergraduate robotics and electric vehicle competition teams, including Construction in Harsh Environments, National Robotic Challenge, ChallengeX, the Trinity College Firefighting Robot, RoboGames, Automotive X-Prize, and the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition.  He has visited many K-12 schools and given many robotics tours for high schools.  He was chosen as the College of Engineering Outstanding Teacher in 2004.


Research Accomplishments

My research interests are generally in the areas of system dynamics and control, with specialization in modeling and simulation.  I have particular expertise in fractional-order systems and their applications.

My work with NASA Glenn Research Center includes specific applications to supersonic inlets, and more recently batteries and energy storage.  The battery research deals with minimum-damage charging techniques to extend battery life.  This has required the development of a generally useful battery modeling method based on first principles.  This model has been implemented numerous times on microcontrollers to determine the state-of-charge of individual battery cells, and provide life-extending control for the particular cell.  Through our Wright Center for Sensor Systems Engineering, we are developing adaptive battery arrays that use networked, wireless, model-embedded microcontrollers to extend the life and functionality of battery packs.

I have published one textbook, one monograph, edited one conference proceedings, have seven book chapters, twenty NASA papers, and over 120 papers in archival journals and national and international technical proceedings.  My research has led to over $1,500,000 in research funding.  I was chosen for a NASA Tiger Team for the International space Station Batteries in 2003.  I am a Senior Member of IEEE, a Senior Member of AIAA, hold one patent, serve on several editorial boards, and have been selected as the 2004 Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Teacher for the College of Engineering.

Education

Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 1984; M.S. Physics, Vanderbilt University, 1982; B.S.E.E., Ohio Northern University, 1980; B.A. Physics, Ohio Northern University, 1980