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Classics

About

There are two undergraduate majors, classics and classical civilization. The latter is substantially the same as the classics major except that no ancient languages are required. Classics faculty teach the ancient history field for the history department's masters and doctoral programs, and the department offers graduate courses at the 500 level.

Policy

Scope and Purpose:

A library collection in support of the Curriculum and research of the department of classics needs to cover the following subject areas: archaeology, ancient history and historiography, ancient Languages, philology, philosophy, ancient religion, mythology, coins, inscriptions, seals, art, architecture, painting, pottery, mosaics, sculpture, ancient literature, ancient science (including medicine), ancient economics and commerce, and ancient military and naval science. All of these are of major importance and, although some are specialized parts of a larger subject area, they should be acquired at the research level because they form part of both the undergraduate and graduate collection. Other users of the classics collection include freshman composition students who use the Homeric collection and students taking courses on the Bible as literature who use the ancient history and archaeology collection. These courses are given by the English department. Philosophy students use the ancient philosophy collection. History, literature, and art students use the collection to supplement course work.

Curriculum:

There are two undergraduate majors, classics and classical civilization. The latter is substantially the same as the classics major except that no ancient Languages are required. Classics faculty teach the ancient history field for the history department's masters and doctoral programs, and the department offers graduate courses at the 500 level. For the master's degree a student selects three fields of which ancient history must be one, the second another history field, and the third a cognate field such as Roman topography. The ancient history field of the doctorate is divided into concentrations on Greece, Rome, and the ancient Near East. Study of the ancient Near East is further divided into the following cultures: Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Palestine. Study of Greece and Rome is further divided into time periods from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic World, Rome and the Empire. Additional fields in history complete the requirements. The Language courses, Greek, Latin, Egyptology, and Assyriology, as well as the archaeology courses for Greece, Rome, the ancient Near East, and Christian archaeology, also use the resources for the subjects detailed above. Courses in literature, mythology, and history and the reading and writing seminars in ancient history--offered in the history department and taught by professors in classics--also require these resources. In order to teach and study materials about those ancient civilizations, particularly those whose writing is not yet deciphered or requires advanced study and transliteration, artifacts are of major importance, so study of other than printed sources is required; hence, therefore, the value of archaeology to ancient history.

Geographical Coverage:

The Greek and Roman worlds and the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the ancient Near East should be covered at research level. Other pertinent areas in Europe and Asia will be covered at the advanced study level.

Language:

English, German, French, Italian, ancient Hebrew, ancient Egyptian, Greek, Greek Linear B, Etruscan, Latin, Languages of the ancient Near East and Asia Minor such as Sumerian, Akkadian, or Hittite, are collected either as ancient Languages to be studied or modern Languages in which materials are presented. About three-fourths of the collection is in English.

Period Coverage:

Coverage begins with predynastic Egypt and Mesopotamia and ends with the fall of Rome in the West (A.D. 476) and Byzantium in the East (1453). Materials are collected up to the research level.

Publication Types:

Publication Types collected are: general works, scholarly works, professional studies, textbooks, collections, handbooks, dictionaries, and encyclopedias. Both monographs and periodicals, are included in the collection. Research and excavation reports as well as many museum publications present some of the most important primary source materials because artifacts are described and ancient texts are published therein.

Formats:

Printed formats, including microforms, are about ninety percent of the collection; 16 mm films, and slide sets comprise the remainder. Materials are now available on CD-ROM. The department has Perseus 1.0, a database of texts and images, for ancient Greece.

Remote Sources:

Case Western Reserve University has a strong collection in classics, particularly in older published works. These supplement our collection.

Exclusions:

Materials on the archaeology of the New World and the Pacific basin are excluded. They are covered by the anthropology program. Materials on sub-Saharan Africa and the Far East, except for areas of conquest, trade, or exploration in ancient times, also are excluded. They are covered by history, general education and Pan African studies.

Policy Revised: 06-1997