Akron Series in Poetry to publish new books by Emilia Phillips and Emily Rosko

The University of Akron Press is pleased to announce that it will publish new books by poets Emilia Phillips and Emily Rosko. Empty Clip by Phillips, and Weather Inventions by Rosko, will be available in spring 2018, and will debut at the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Tampa.


Emilia Phillips is the author of two other poetry collections from the University of Akron Press, Signaletics (2013) and Groundspeed (2016), and three chapbooks. Her poems and lyric essays appear widely in literary publications including Agni, Boston Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, and elsewhere. She’s an assistant professor in the MFA Writing Program and the Department of English at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

The poems of Empty Clip bore into the cultures of violence in the United States while candidly cross-firing upon the poets’ complicity and testifying on these cultures’ effects upon female body image and mental health. From a meditation about a bullet hole-animated PowerPoint presentation on campus shooters to the startled invective against an unprovoked dick pic, lyrics brooding upon illness-driven suicidal thoughts to narratives about a slippery memory of childhood abuse, Emilia Phillips’s third poetry collection sears with the “angry love” of self, in order to find some truth that’s nevertheless “a broken bone that can’t be / set.”

Emily Rosko is the author of two previous poetry collections: Prop Rockery, winner of the 2011 Akron Poetry Prize, and Raw Goods Inventory, winner of the 2005 Iowa Poetry Prize. She has been the recipient of the Stegner and Ruth Lilly fellowships. Editor of A Broken Thing: Poets on the Line (University of Iowa Press, 2011), she also is the poetry editor for Crazyhorse. She is associate professor of English at the College of Charleston.

“First marvel; then record.” This tempered revision of Wordsworth’s famous definition of poetry as a spontaneous overflow of powerful emotion recollected in tranquility serves as a useful guide to Emily Rosko’s Weather Inventions. The poems in Rosko’s third collection capture an enduring sense of wonder in the face of nature alongside the scientific impulse to observe and measure. At turns evasive and earnest, erudite and unguarded, researched and unbooked, the poems in Rosko’s Weather Inventions chart humanity’s enduring attachments to weather in science and art. Weather is the creative force here, inspiring a search for objective and reflective truths about our lives on this planet.