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The Manifesto Project

The poetic manifesto has a long, rich history that hasn’t been updated until now. What does a poetic manifesto look like in a time of increased pluralism, relativism, and danger? How can a manifesto open a space for new and diverse voices? Forty-seven poets at different stages of their careers contribute to this new anthology, demonstrating the relevance of the declarative form… >>Read more

Map of the Folded World

Map of the Folded World, John Gallaher's third full-length collection, examines the eros and desperation of suburban America with the precision of a cartographer's eye. But as its title suggests, it does so according to the polar opposite of convention. More concerned with subtext than narrative, often childlike in tone and propelled by the logic of innocence, Gallaher's poems don't shy … >>Read more

Mistaking the Sea for Green Fields

Winner of the 2005 Akron Poetry Prize

In her first book, Mistaking the Sea for Green Fields, Ashley Capps sounds like the voice of a fresh generation of poets, where the familiar turns suddenly elliptical, straight talk goes engagingly crooked, and the lyric negotiates with the matter-of-fact. Desperate for something solid to believe in, Capps still mistrusts authority, feeling… >>Read more

Mixing the Waters

The largest, most costly domestic public works project ever undertaken by the Army Corps of Engineers, the Tenn-Tom's 234 miles, five dams, and ten locks entailed the movement of more earth than was required to dig the Panama Canal. In a monumental history of the nation's largest navigation project, Jeffrey K. Stine records the struggle between the interests determined to build the waterway and… >>Read more

Modern Solar Facilities

An international workshop entitled: Modern Solar Facilities Advanced Solar Science was held in Göttingen from September 27 until September 29, 2006. The workshop, which was attended by 88 participants from 24 different countries, gave a broad overview of the current state of solar research, with emphasis on modern telescopes and techniques, advanced observational methods and results, and … >>Read more

Mr. Chairman

Ray Bliss was a masterful behind-the-scenes force in the Republican Party for more than three decades at the local, state, and national levels. Recognized as a master of the “nuts and bolts” of practical politics, Bliss was among the first to use polling and television in campaigns. When Bliss took over as national chairman in 1965, the GOP was on life support after Barry Goldwater&… >>Read more

Murder, Culture, and Injustice

Walter Hixson's pithy narrative account of four sensational national murder cases—the Lizzie Borden, Lindbergh baby, Sam Sheppard, and O. J. Simpson trials offers interesting observations into the greater cultural and political forces that shaped their verdicts.

His step-by-step analysis of the details of each case provides not only insight by skillful synthesis of the existing li… >>Read more

Mysteries of the Hopewell

Buried beneath today's Midwestern towns, under several layers of earth and the accumulated debris of two thousand years, are the clues to an ancient mystery. A Native American people, now known as the Hopewell, lived and worked these lands, building earthworks which in some instances dwarf the ruins at Stonehenge. More significantly, these mammoth earthworks were built in different geometric sh… >>Read more