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Department of Sociology at The University of Akron

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

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DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Olin Hall 247
Akron, OH 44325-1905
330-972-7481

Office hours
Monday – Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (4:30 in summer)

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Welcome to Sociology!

The Department of Sociology at The University of Akron is an active community of undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members who apply the tools of sociology to better understand and improve our ever changing and complex world.   As teachers and scholars, we work to create a welcoming environment for all.  We respect and celebrate our diversity as we collectively pursue inclusive excellence in learning and teaching.

News from the Department of Sociology

Sociology students present their research

Students present research

Sociology students continue to proudly represent the University of Akron. Their scholarship ranges from the study of social problems that challenge us today to the promise of teaching initiatives to improve the learning process. Below are the titles and locations of each presentation:

Nick Gotsiridze (Williams Honors College Scholar) and Jimmy Carter (UA Sociology Graduate Student). “The Collateral Cost of Mass Incarceration: A Qualitative Study of Health among Returned Citizens.” at the University of Akron Interdisciplinary Symposium and at the North East Ohio Undergraduate Sociology Symposium (NEOUSS) at Oberlin College in April.  

Molly Hartsough (UA Sociology Graduate Student). November 15, 2018. “Childhood Abuse, Community Resources, and Sex Trafficking Victimization: A Test of General Strain Theory” American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meeting. Poster. Atlanta, GA.

Molly Hartsough (UA Sociology Graduate Student), Erin Andro, Kaitlyn Root (UA Sociology Graduate Student), and Eric Victory (UA Sociology Graduate Student). March 1, 2019. “An Active Participation Session on Teaching Sensitive Topics and Dealing with Challenging Student Situations” New Explorations in Teaching (NEXT) Conference. Panel Discussion. Akron, OH.    

Molly Hartsough (UA Sociology Graduate Student) and Matthew T. Lee (Harvard University). March 15, 2019. “Creating Open Space in Higher Education as a Path to Flourishing for Students, Faculty, and the Broader Community” Eastern Sociological Society (ESS) Annual Meeting.  Paper Presentation. Boston, MA.

Molly Hartsough (UA Sociology Graduate Student.) March 16, 2019. “"Do Justice’ or ‘Seek Justice’? Conflicting or Complementary Prosecutor Obligations.” Eastern Sociological Society (ESS) Annual Meeting. Paper Presentation. Boston, MA.

Molly Hartsough (UA Sociology Graduate Student.) April 9, 2019. “Victim-Blaming Attitudes and Gender: The Cumulative Effect on Bystander Intervention for an Intimate Partner Violence Victim” UA Interdisciplinary Symposium Symposium. Poster. Akron, OH.

Kaitlyn Root (UA Sociology Graduate Student) and Jacob S. Church, Kent State University  “Appalachian Welfare-to-work Clients in Ohio,” Society for the Study of Social Problems, Summer 2018, Philadelphia. 

Brianna Turgeon, Tiffany Taylor and Christi Gross, Kaitlyn Root (UA Sociology Graduate Student) and Kasey Ray. “Stigma, Pride, and Shame: An Exploration of Program Managers’ Talk and Expectations for Cash Assistance Recipients,” Society for the Study of Social Problems, Summer 2018, Philadelphia. 

Brianna Turgeon, Kaitlyn Root (UA Sociology Graduate Student), and Tiffany Taylor "Emotion Work and Identity Work: A Qualitative Analysis of Ohio Welfare–to–Work Managers’ Professional Identities and Use of Feeling Rules" –.  Society for Women in Sociology, Winter 2019, Denver .

Ebenezer Duah (UA Sociology Graduate Student). Bullying Victimization and Juvenile Delinquency in Ghana. University of Akron’s Interdisciplinary Symposium, April 2019.

Matthew Williamson (UA Sociology Graduate Student) and Abigail Williamson (UA Student). “Behind the Mask: An Examination of Gender and Comic Book Fans” Poster presented at the first University of Akron’s Interdisciplinary Symposium, April 2019. Akron. 

Jodi C. Noland, Scott Swiatek (UA Sociology Graduate Students) “A Theoretical Model of Group Positioning and Community Policing.” Poster presented at the first University of Akron’s Interdisciplinary Symposium, April 2019. Akron.

Nusrat Islam (UA Sociology Graduate Student). “Teams in a Multigenerational Workforce: Perceptions on Job Satisfaction, Engagement, and Team Performance.” Poster presented at the first University of Akron’s Interdisciplinary Symposium, April 2019. Akron.

Katie Bullock (UA Sociology Graduate Student).  “Unintended Punishments: Examining the Mental Health Impacts of Barriers to Communicating with Loved Ones in Prison.” Poster presented at the first University of Akron’s Interdisciplinary Symposium, April 2019. Akron.


Student earns top graduate student award

Law student chatting in the library

Dr. Bill Lyons presenting award to Molly Hartsough

CONGRATULATIONS to Molly B. Hartsough! Molly received the Buchtel College of Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Award at the University of Akron Interdisciplinary Symposium (UAIS).

“Victim-Blaming Attitudes and Gender: The Cumulative Effect on Bystander Intervention for an Intimate Partner Violence Victim”

“Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) impacts thousands of women across the United States each year. This study examines the effect of IPV myth belief on bystander willingness to call for police intervention for an IPV assault. I propose that bystanders who believe in IPV myths are less likely to call for police assistance for a victim experiencing a physical assault by an intimate partner. Data were collected from 708 students enrolled at a Midwest public university during the 2015 spring semester. I use Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression to examine the relationship between bystander willingness to call police, IPV myths, gender, and racial / ethnic identity for the full sample. I also examine gender-specific models. Results indicate that belief in IPV myths reduce bystander willingness to call police for IPV assaults. Additionally, Black respondents are less willing to call police compared to White respondents. The independent variable effects operate differently for Male and Female respondents. Overall, this study suggests that belief in IPV myths reduces bystander willingness to intervene by calling police for a victim during an IPV assault. University educators should consider how to counteract these beliefs through curriculum that educates students about the realities of IPV victimization.”

In this project, I used survey data that I collected in Spring 2015 for use in my Senior Capstone research project – I re-worked the hypotheses according to a greatly revised and expanded literature review and re-did the statistical analysis from scratch using what I’ve learned in my graduate studies. I decided to use this particular project for UA IS so that I could demonstrate to our Akron undergrad students that what you do in your undergraduate years in terms of research is important and relevant – and that it’s ok to make mistakes (I really screwed up on parts of the data collection, but my undergrad advisors gave me enough freedom to make mistakes without ruining the entire dataset!).