TESOL:  Graduate Endorsement

The TESOL Endorsement program is designed for K-12 teachers, including special education teachers who seek to deepen their understanding of how to teach English as a second language. The program of study provides multiple opportunities to explore best practices in teaching English as a second language and meet the needs of English learners (ELs). The program provides a solid foundation in linguistics, second language acquisition theory, second language pedagogy, and opportunities to observe and practice approaches to teaching ELs.

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Requirements

  • The TESOL Endorsement is required in order to teach English as a second language in an Ohio public/chartered school.  It must be attached to a teaching certificate or license.
  • Passing the Ohio Assessments for Educators (OAE) Test for English to Speakers of Other Languages is required at the end of the program.
  • Non-native speakers of English must have a minimum score of 79 on the internet-based TOEFL.

Course Descriptions

Total credit hours:  19

This is a foundation course in linguistics with a focus on academic language development of second language learners. Fundamental concepts in the core of linguistics, including morphology, syntax, semantics, phonetics, phonology, and pragmatics are covered in lectures and structured linguistic exercises with discussions on practical applications to classroom instruction. Students apply the linguistic knowledge and analytic tools learned in this class to analyze content texts and to make connections between linguistics and their professional and personal lives.

This course surveys methods and materials for teaching listening, speaking, reading, and writing to English Learners. It also examines factors that impact language learning, such as attitudes, motivation, and sociocultural background. This course includes 10 hours of field experience.  Ten field hours required.

This course explores issues and practices related to the instruction and assessment of English Learners (EL) with exceptional needs with an emphasis on the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP®) model. The focus is to provide a greater understanding of the relationship between culture, language and disability so as to promote effective services for the linguistically diverse student and their participation in the classroom. Specific topics include disproportionate representation of ELs in special education, the influence of culture on ELs, assessment issues and placement options for ELs with high-incidence disabilities and techniques for providing instruction and adaptations for students with high-incidence disabilities, especially in inclusive settings. This is a web based course.

This course introduces and explains quality, research-based sheltered instruction for improving teaching effectiveness and accelerating academic achievement for English learners. Specifically, the focus is on developing a thorough understanding of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP®) Model. This is a web-based course.  Fifteen field hours required.

This course surveys first and second language acquisition theories and language teaching methods with an emphasis on the connection between first language literacy and second language reading and writing development as well as content-based language teaching. Principles of the teaching of English as a second language based on research in linguistics, psycholinguistics, and second language pedagogy are explored in lectures, structured readings, discussions, and projects targeting content text complexity with effective academic language teaching strategies.

This course applies methods for teaching reading and writing to English language learners’ pre-K-12, assessment of literacy skills, and selection, development, and evaluation of materials. This course includes 15 hours of field experience.

This is a supervised student teaching experience in an ESL classroom.  Ten field hours required.